Self-Assessment Customers Use Monthly Payments

More than 20,000 Self-Assessment customers have used HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) online monthly payment plan service since April to spread the cost of their tax bill, totalling £46million so far, it has been revealed.
Where customers are struggling to pay their bill in full, the self-serve Time to Pay service allows Self-Assessment customers to manage how they pay their tax liabilities. Customers can use the online service for tax bills worth up to £30,000 without the need to talk to HMRC. The service will create a bespoke monthly payment plan for the customer based on how much tax is owed and the length of time needed to pay.

Last year, 123,000 customers used self-serve Time to Pay to spread the cost of their 2019/20 tax bill, worth £460 million.

Customers have until 31 January 2022 to complete their 2020/21 tax return and pay their bill. If they cannot pay in full, customers can set up their own Time to Pay arrangement online if they:

  • Have filed their 2020/21 tax return
  • Owe less than £30,000
  • Are within 60 days of the payment deadline
  • Plan to pay their debt off within the next 12 months or less

If customers owe more than £30,000, or need longer to pay, they should call the Self-Assessment Payment Helpline on 0300 200 3822.
Myrtle Lloyd, HMRC’s Director General for Customer Services, said: “We understand some customers might be worrying about paying their Self-Assessment bill this year, and we want to support them.
To see if you are eligible to set up a payment plan, go to GOV.UK and search ‘pay my Self-Assessment’.”
Self-serve Time to Pay is just one-way customers can pay their Self Assessment tax bill, a full list of alternative payment methods is available on GOV.UK.
HMRC urges everyone to be alert if they are contacted out of the blue by someone asking for money or personal information.
Customers should always type in the full online address www.gov.uk/hmrc to get the correct link for filing their Self Assessment return online securely and free of charge. HMRC sees high numbers of fraudsters emailing, calling, or texting people claiming to be from the department. If in doubt, HMRC advises not to reply directly to anything suspicious, but to contact them straight away and to search GOV.UK for ‘HMRC scams.

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